Q. How long have you been birding?
A.
Q. What got you interested in birding?
Q.  What's your favorite birding spot in Oklahoma?
Introducing our August 2003
Birder of the Month:

Jo Loyd
of Tulsa, Oklahoma
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Q.  What are your 3 favorite birds? and is/are there any particular reason(s) they're your favorites??
Q.  Tell us about your BEST birding experience.... so far.
Q.  What was your WORST??
Q.  What are you most likely to say when a bird flies before you can ID it??
Q.  What was the last book you read?
Approximately 25 years.  I started after my son left for college.
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I have always looked at the birds in my backyard.  I took an Oklahoma ecological trip with Harriet Barclay (retired Professor of Botany at the University of Tulsa).  There were a number of birds on the trip, and I gradually moved over from plants to birds (while on Barclay's trip) after meeting members of Tulsa Audubon Society.
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There are too many great birding spots to choose just one.  It depends somewhat on what the season is.  For local birding spots in the winter, it is Lake Yahola for ducks and waterfowl.  It is close and doesn't take much time to reach.  In the spring, Woodward Park is good for warblers and migrants.
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Q.  What field guide do you prefer to use?
I use the National Geographic Society Field Guide to the Birds of North America because of its convenient size and the fact that it shows most plumages.
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One is the Yellow-throated Warbler, probably because it was the first warbler song that I learned when I started birding and it is one of the first warblers to arrive in this area.  One cannot leave off the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher as it is a signal that spring is really here.  I selected the Pileated Woodpecker as my third choice as it is a very striking bird to look at.
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I think a birding trip to Arizona some years back was exceptional as every bird I looked at was a bird that I had not seen before.  All birds had to be confirmed by looking at the field guide or talking to an Arizona birder.
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Can you have a bad experience while you are birding?  Probably the time my car decided not to run northwest of Oklahoma City on a very hot Sunday afternoon.  I learned a few coping skills and the local people were very helpful.  I got the car back in town, left it at the local dealer with a note and the keys, and bummed a ride home with another car of birders.  It all worked out, just inconvenient.
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"Come back here!" or "Rats!!"
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Black and Blue.
Q.  Who are your heroes or role models?  Whom do you admire? and if you care to comment, why are they your heroes?
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I think I had a number of role models while I was growing up.  The main role models were my Mother and my Grandmother.  Another role model was the teacher I had from first grade through seventh grade at the country school I attended.  They seemed to deal with whatever came their way in a positive manner without complaining.  You always felt you were important to them.
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